Are You a Project Manager Or a Project Mangler?


Which one are you? An effective IT project manager, able to deliver software on time, according to specs, and within budget, or someone referred to by your peers as a project mangler? Find out with these Top 10 Signs You're a Project Mangler.

10. Your .mpp attachments are considered to be more harmful than the Netsky virus.

9. You think your job description is limited to running around and asking people "Are you done yet?"

8. Your record for the "longest consecutive number of days without changing your project plan" is 3, which was achieved over a weekend.

7. You don't publish your project plan for fear developers might find out what the REAL dates are.

6. When the first 90% of your project is done, the second 90% begins.

5. You couldn't write a line of code to save your life, yet you tell developers how long it will take them to complete their feature.

4. You only work from 9 to 5 but expect developers to work evenings and weekends to meet your deadlines.

3. Your best motivational skill: telling people you're working from home tomorrow.

2. You DO think that 9 people can have a baby in 1 month.

And the number one sign you're a project mangler...

1. Your name is R. U. Dunyet.

Luc Richard holds an MBA with a major in high technology. For the past 10 years, he's been managing the development of software applications. He is the founder of The Project Mangler (www.projectmangler.com">http://www.projectmangler.com), an online resource that publishes free articles, stories, and other ready-to-use tools to help developers, team leaders and managers deliver software projects on time, according to specs, and within budget.


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President delivers threat after three of four main opposition parties refuse to take part in Sunday’s mayoral polls

President Nicolás Maduro has threatened to disqualify major opposition parties from future elections in Venezuela after boycott-affected mayoral polls left him more dominant than at any time since he took power in 2013.

The ruling socialists won 300 of the 335 mayoral offices on Sunday as three of the four main opposition groups refused to participate, claiming the voting was rigged by a “dictator”.

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A 27-year-old man was in custody on Monday after detonating an explosive device on the New York City subway during the morning commute.

The suspect, Akayed Ullah, was one of four people injured in the explosion, which occurred at about 7.20am in a passageway near 42nd Street and 8th Avenue, in midtown Manhattan near Times Square, New York City police said.

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Israeli PM had asked EU member states to recognise city as capital of Israel, and to back US peace initiative

European foreign ministers have strongly rejected calls by Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, for them to follow Donald Trump’s example and recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

Opposition from across the European spectrum came as Netanyahu made the first official trip to the EU by a sitting Israeli premier in 22 years.

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Ban on US passport holders travelling to Pyongyang stops former basketball star from making sixth trip

Dennis Rodman, the American basketball star turned freelance diplomat , has urged Donald Trump to sign him up as a peace envoy to North Korea after his latest foray into Kim Jong-un’s hermit kingdom was scuppered by a travel ban preventing US citizens from visiting.

During an interview in Beijing, from where Rodman had hoped to fly to Pyongyang for his sixth trip there, the former NBA star said US officials had discouraged him from doing so amid continuing tensions between the countries. “Basically they said it’s not a good time right now,” he said.

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Police clash with protesters in Lleida as 44 works of art at centre of dispute between Catalonia and region of Aragón are removed

Scuffles broke out between police and demonstrators after hundreds of people gathered outside a museum in the Catalan city of Lleida to protest against the removal of 44 works of art that have been at the centre of a long-running dispute between Catalonia and the neighbouring region of Aragón.

The pieces, which include paintings, alabaster reliefs and polychromatic wooden coffins, were sold to the Catalan government by the nuns of the Sijena convent, in Aragón, in the 1980s.

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President Macron under pressure to negotiate after nationalists demand talks in wake of Sunday’s regional election triumph

Corsican nationalists have demanded talks with the French government over more autonomy after a convincing win in Sunday’s regional elections.

President Emmanuel Macron now faces the dilemma of whether to loosen France’s grip on the Mediterranean island or to maintain centralised control.

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Past few months have seen scion of Nehru-Gandhi family working on presenting himself as serious challenger to PM Modi

Power has passed to a fourth generation of India’s most influential political dynasty after the election of Rahul Gandhi as the president of the Indian National Congress.

The scion of the Nehru-Gandhi family, which has produced three of India’s prime ministers, including its founding PM, Jawaharlal Nehru, and two who were assassinated in office, was announced as the new leader of India’s chief opposition party on Monday.

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As southern California entered its second week engulfed in flames, fire officials said they anticipated more growth and danger due to continued strong wind gusts, no rain and decades-old dry vegetation.

Related: California's hellish fires: a visit from the Ghost of Christmas Future | Dana Nuccitelli

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Move forms part of social reforms by the crown prince that are shaking up the ultra-conservative kingdom

Saudi Arabia is to allow cinemas to open for the first time in 35 years as it continues a push to overhaul its society and image after decades of hardline rule.

The first movie theatres will be opened by March and it is intended that up to 2,000 screens will be in place within 12 years.

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As the Gaza death toll mounts, France and Turkey want the US president to change his mind over recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital

The Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, is expected to reject an invitation to meet Donald Trump in Washington, amid a strong emerging consensus among key advisers that there are “no conditions” for dialogue following the US president’s formal recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

The issue of how best to respond to Trump’s announcement is at the centre of a series of emergency meetings of senior Palestinian leaders, which began on Saturday. They are expected to conclude early next week with a rare meeting of the PLO central council, and have already concluded that Abbas should not meet vice president Mike Pence when he visits Israel and Palestine just before Christmas.

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French president makes emotional address calling for ‘people’s tribute’, as singer’s body is driven through capital on final journey

To the blast of electric guitars, the revving of Harley-Davidsons, applause and tears, France bade an emotional farewell to 74-year-old Johnny Hallyday, France’s rock and roll “national hero” on Saturday.

The centre of Paris ground to a halt as the wave of national grief that had overwhelmed the country following the death of the singer, known as the French Elvis, on Wednesday morning finally broke.

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Foreign secretary did not get to speak to key decision-makers in Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe case: the revolutionary courts

Not long before travelling to Tehran for two days of talks, Boris Johnson described Iran as resembling “one of those Russian dolls”, in the sense that there is a state within the outer democratic Iranian state, primarily run by the Revolutionary Guards.

At one level, the bulk of his high-stakes talks were with the outer state of the president, Hassan Rouhani, and the foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif. But in his efforts to secure the release of the UK dual national Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, it could be argued that he did not gain access to the inner state and revolutionary courts, the true decision-makers in her case.

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Massive wildfire torches nearly 800 buildings and destroys 230,000 acres along coastline as firefighters battle the flames

Crews battling a massive wind-driven Californian wildfire that has torched nearly 800 buildings and charred 230,000 acres are bracing to protect towns near Santa Barbara menaced by flames along the state’s scenic coastline.

The Thomas fire ignited last week and is burning in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, about 100 miles north-west of Los Angeles.

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President Assad tells Russian leader Syrian people will ‘never forget’ Russia’s help in driving Islamic State from country

Vladimir Putin has declared mission accomplished for Russian forces in the fight against Islamic State in Syria, as he made a surprise visit to the Russian airbase in the country.

“Friends, the motherland is waiting for you,” Putin told the Russian air force detachment based at the Khmeimim airbase during his visit on Monday morning. “You are coming back home with victory.”

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Earthquakes don’t kill people (generally), collapsing buildings do – meaning it is cities where the most lives can be saved. Here are their smartest ideas so far

Between 1994 and 2013, nearly half a million people around the world died due to earthquakes, with another 118.3 million affected. A further 250,000 deaths resulted from subsequent tsunamis – chiefly in 2004 in the Indian Ocean – and more than 700 from ash fall.

Earthquakes affect every continent, though certain areas – the Pacific border of South America, the western coast of North America and Mexico, Alaska, south-eastern Europe, New Zealand and much of Asia – are especially prone. Though rarer than floods, they can cause devastating damage and large numbers of casualties very quickly. The Haitian earthquake in January 2010 killed an estimated 230,000 people, injured 300,000 and displaced 1.5 million from their homes. It also caused around $8bn of destruction, and its impacts are still being felt today.

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A sun-baked Niemeyer treasure, a decaying Montana schoolhouse and a scary manmade cave are just some of the striking pieces shortlisted for the 2017 Art of Building photography awards. The winner will be announced in January

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Forbidden from striking, officers in Montreal’s 4,600-strong police force wore non-regulation colourful cargo pants, checkered clown trousers and animal-print leggings in their three-year fight over pensions. They won a 20% pay rise

At the intersection of Saint Catherine Street and Bishop Street in downtown Montreal, it was hard to miss the group of police officers, standing outside the station, watching for jaywalkers. But the first thing you noticed was not the badges or the guns, but their fluorescent camouflage-print trousers.

This was not the official uniform of Montreal’s 4,600-person strong police force, the Service de Police de la Ville de Montréal, or SPVM. Since July 2014 most officers have worn colourful trousers in protest against stagnant pay and proposed cuts to their pensions, over which they had been locked in a lengthy dispute with city hall. They said that since they had no right to strike, wearing camo-print trousers was the only way to express their unhappiness.

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Trapped between the Burmese army and the Chinese border, the stronghold of the Christian Kachin people is quietly gearing up for its first film festival

Laiza is a city under siege – sort of. On one side of this remote, mountainous but important settlement in Myanmar’s breakaway Kachin state lurks the dreaded Burmese army. On the other, marking the city limits, is the Chinese border. “People are worried,” says Dau Hku, an official with the rebel Kachin Independence Army (KIA), which controls Laiza as the de facto capital of its small and shifting breakaway territory. “Everyone knows we are within shelling range.”

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In recognising Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, the US president has hindered the prospect of peace in the region

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Plunging temperatures, ice and snow forecast to combine to create treacherous conditions on the roads and railways

In the north east three schools have been closed in Northumberland and another three in County Durham.

At least 586 schools have been closed in the south-east owing to the weather.

Here is a breakdown within the region:

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MPs warn foreign secretary against pursuing investment in country with poor record on corruption and human rights, ahead of controversial London summit

Boris Johnson has come under fire over Britain’s stance on trading with Sudan ahead of a controversial forum due to take place in London on Tuesday.

A group of MPs have signed a letter to the foreign secretary warning the government against pursuing investment in a country rife with corruption and where the president is wanted for human rights violations.

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  • One suspect in custody after explosion near Port Authority in Manhattan
  • Four people left with non-life threatening injuries
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Reports of New Yorkers frightened or panicked by the explosion are greatly exaggerated, Jamiles Lartey relays.

“It’s the subway, you know,” commuter Shaun Henderson said. “New Yorkers are used to this. The F train doesn’t need a pipe bomb to be fucked up.”

“Another idiot out there.” Elderly Brooklyn lady explains the situation to her fellow commuters.

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Prime minister says it’s ‘absurd’ to say he is anti-Beijing as poll shows parties are neck and neck in Bennelong byelection

Malcolm Turnbull has declared an Australian prime minister with a Chinese granddaughter cannot be anti-Beijing, and he has branded any suggestion to the contrary “outrageous” and “absurd”.

In a combative performance on the ABC’s Q&A program on Monday night, Turnbull rejected a suggestion that Australia’s intelligence agencies could have leaked details of a private conversation between the Labor senator Sam Dastyari and the Chinese businessman Huang Xiangmo, and insisted that when it came to combating Chinese interference in this country, Australia was entitled to stand up for its sovereign interests.

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European council president Donald Tusk to tell EU summit that mandatory quotas have been ‘divisive and ineffective’

The EU could scrap a divisive scheme that compels member states to accept quotas of refugees, one of the bloc’s most senior leaders will say this week.

The president of the European council, Donald Tusk, will tell EU leaders at a summit on Thursday that mandatory quotas have been divisive and ineffective, in a clear sign that he is ready to abandon the policy that has created bitter splits across the continent.

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Residents near the world’s fourth largest hydroelectric power plant say the Belo Monte dam has made their houses prone to floods of waste water

A line on the wall of Carlos Alves Moraes’ house shows the highwater mark of the flood which hit his neighbourhood in August. Houses near the lagoon are built on stilts to protect against seasonal rains, but now, because of the dam, they are prone to flooding throughout the year, he says.

“We spent 17 days in August living here with our feet under water,” he says.

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Patients too poor to settle medical debts are chained to drainpipes, starved and abused in health centres across parts of Africa and Asia, report reveals

Hospitals are detaining hundreds of thousands of people against their will every year – many of them mothers and their newborn babies – simply because they are too poor to pay their medical bills, a study has found.

The practice, which is widespread across parts of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, sees patients chained to drainpipes, starved and abused, and forced to perform sexual acts in exchange for cash to pay off their bills, according to the paper published by Chatham House this week.

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When a Sri Lankan family moved to the Gulf in search of a better life, they reckoned without stringent labour laws that would bring unspeakable grief

Holed up in an apartment on the seventh floor of a tower block in Sharjah, the family of five desperate Sri Lankans were racking up debts and disquiet at an alarming rate.

Unable to pay fines that had been mounting daily since their visas expired four years earlier, they felt trapped. The father’s passport had been withheld by an employer, which meant the 55-year-old could neither find work in the United Arab Emirates nor leave the wealthy Gulf state to seek employment elsewhere.

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With nearly a million Rohingya driven out of Myanmar in what the UN has called textbook ‘ethnic cleansing’, Lucy Lamble hears about the situation on the ground in Bangladesh – and how the international community can help

Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have fled their homes in Myanmar’s Rakhine state in the wake of a brutal offensive by the Burmese army. Traumatised men, women and children with horrific stories have arrived in Bangladesh, and NGOs and the Dhaka government are struggling to cope.

Lucy Lamble is joined by Dr Champa Patel, head of the Asia Programme at Chatham House, and Asif Saleh, senior director of communications, strategy and empowerment, from Brac, an NGO working in Bangladesh and beyond, to discuss the humanitarian situation in Cox’s Bazar and the politics of the crisis.

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I was extremely hesitant to share my immigration status, and my sexuality – but I did it, and I’m stronger for it. I say to others like me: you are not alone

Put yourself in my shoes for a moment.

You’re a child. You’re five years old. You leave the country you were born in for another. You’re with your mother, and all you have is a few belongings, the promise of seeing your father again, and the hope for a better tomorrow.

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The Trump administration has put the future of young, undocumented immigrants at risk. Meet our guest editors and hear what they have to say

As soon as Justino Mora wakes up, a new number pops into his head.

At first, it was 322. Then, 305. 301. 297. Eventually, it will be zero.

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Two days after America’s closest allies denounced it in the United Nations, a day after an Israeli air strike killed two in Gaza and hours after protests erupted near the US embassy in Lebanon, Donald Trump’s ambassador to the UN relayed his message to the world: “The sky’s still up there. It hasn’t fallen.”

Related: Macron tells Netanyahu that US recognition of Jerusalem is threat to peace

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Inequality predicts homicide rates ‘better than any other variable’, says an expert – and it is linked to a highly developed concern for one’s own status

A 17-year-old boy shoots a 15-year-old stranger to death, apparently believing that the victim had given him a dirty look. A Chicago man stabs his stepfather in a fight over whether his entry into his parents’ house without knocking was disrespectful. A San Francisco UPS employee guns down three of his co-workers, then turns his weapon on himself, seemingly as a response to minor slights.

These killings may seem unrelated – but they are only a few recent examples of the kind of crime that demonstrates a surprising link between homicide and inequality.

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Four people were reported as injured in an explosion in the Manhattan area of the city on Monday. The incident happened at around 7:20am local time in a passageway between the 42nd Street Times Square station and the New York Port Authority

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The US ambassador to the UN has said women who accuse President Donald Trump or anyone else of sexual harassment or assault 'should be heard'. Speaking to the CBS programme Face the Nation on Sunday, Nikki Haley added: 'Women should always feel comfortable coming forward and we should all be willing to listen to them'

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A ferry carrying more than 200 passengers has become stuck in windy conditions in Calais, the local government said on Sunday. The Pride of Kent, which was bound for Dover at about midday, is believed to have run aground on a sandbank in the harbour

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Horses at the San Luis Rey training centre in San Diego fled from their enclosure as wildfires engulf the area. Volunteers loosened the fence of a pen enclosing the animals who quickly ran away, panicked by the thick smoke

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Pro-Palestinian protesters demonstrate near the US embassy in Lebanon four days after Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

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Iraq has formally declared its fight against Islamic State over after three years of heavy combat. Isis has been driven from all the territory it once held in the country, the prime minister, Haider al-Abadi, announced in Baghdad on Saturday, although surviving militants are widely expected to launch a guerrilla war

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In a conversation recorded this summer, Republican Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks to Paul Lewis of the Guardian about the Ten Commandments, Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin.

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