Ten Top Performance Management Tips


  • Talk to Your People Often
    By building a great relationship with your people you will bring trust, honesty and information. This gives you a head start in Performance Management of your people.

  • Build Feedback In
    On the job two-way feedback processes gets rid of the nasty surprises that gives Performance Management such a bad name. By building it in as a natural activity, you take the edge away.

  • Be Honest
    By being frank and honest, which the preparation work in building a great relationship has afforded you, both parties treat each other with respect and see each other as working for everyone's benefit.

  • Notice Great Performance
    When you see good stuff, shout about it! Let people know. Celebrate successes and filter this into formal processes.

  • Have a System
    Performance Management is a process and needs some formality - especially for good personnel practice and record. This need not be complicated, but it needs to be organised and have timescales.

  • Keep it Simple
    But do keep it simple. If you have a relationship with your people that is strong anyway, you already know what they are about. Formal discussions can be friendly and simple, with formality kept to a minimum.

  • Be Very Positive
    Celebrate great performance! Focus on what's going well. It's about successes and building on strengths, not spending ages on their weaknesses - that serves no-one. Go with the positives!

  • Achieve Their Needs
    Remember that we all have needs that we want fulfilling. By working with your people to create outcomes that will do this, you will strengthen your relationships and channel effort in a constructive direction.

  • Tackle Discipline
    Whilst it often happens, Performance Management is not about managing indiscipline. That has to be managed in a different way. By setting clear standards in your business that everyone understands and signs up to, discipline becomes much, much easier.

  • Learn from Mistakes
    As part of regular on-the-job and informal review, mistakes will come to light; things will go wrong. By using the 'What went well? And 'What could you do differently?' format, the unsatisfactory performance becomes controllable and a positive step.

    Try these ten out, maybe not all together, but one at a time. Have fun! There are other benefits apart from just improving the performance of your people - can you spot them?

    Copyright 2005 Martin Haworth is a Business and Management Coach. He works worldwide, mainly by phone, with small business owners, managers and corporate leaders. He has hundreds of hints, tips and ideas at his website, www.coaching-businesses-to-success.com. (Note to editors. Feel free to use this article, wherever you think it might be of value - it would be good if you could include a live link)

    ...helping you, to help your people, to help your business grow...


    MORE RESOURCES:

    Chaotic scenes on outskirts of campus, as hundreds remain trapped inside

    There has been confusion throughout Monday about whether protesters will be allowed to leave the besieged university campus they have been occupying for the past few days. Earlier attempts to escape have been met with tear gas and arrest, prompting some of the protesters to retreat back inside.

    Hong Kong police have just issued a statement saying the Red Cross has been allowed onto the campus and will be allowed to convey some students to hospital “if necessary”.

    Police are aware of injuries inside Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) which has been struck by recurrent violence. Police attach great importance to the situation and have arranged for ambulances to convey injured people to hospital for treatment. This morning (November 18), Police started to make arrangement for Red Cross volunteers to enter the PolyU. At around 2pm [6am GMT], Red Cross volunteers arrived at PolyU to provide first aid to injured people, some of whom would be conveyed to hospital if necessary.

    Police have formed a tight perimeter around Hong Kong Polytechnic University and are not letting anyone in, including journalists. Protesters trying to escape have been tear gassed and arrested, and some have retreated back inside.

    A volunteer inside the campus says there are about 300 or 400 people left in the university. Asked what they plan to do, she says: “They are 20 year old kids. They don’t have plans. Everyone is nervous.”

    Continue reading...

    US president says potential Democratic rival is ‘somewhat better than that’ and urges North Korean leader to agree nuclear deal

    Donald Trump has come to the defence of one of his potential rivals for the presidency, telling North Korea its recent description of Joe Biden as a “rabid dog” that should be “beaten to death” was a little unfair.

    Trump’s criticism of Pyongyang – albeit via a half-hearted endorsement of Biden’s character – came amid attempts to resurrect stalled nuclear talks, with Trump imploring North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, to “get the deal done”, and the US and South Korea agreeing to postpone an annual air force drill the North routinely condemns as a rehearsal for an invasion.

    Continue reading...

    Exclusive: PM’s relationship with Helen Macintyre will be examined by London assembly

    An investigation into the prime minister’s relationship with the US businesswoman Jennifer Arcuri will also review an affair that Boris Johnson failed to declare when he was mayor of London, the Guardian can reveal.

    Johnson escaped censure in 2010 when he failed to declare an interest over an unpaid City Hall adviser, Helen Macintyre, who it later emerged had an extramarital affair with the then London mayor and gave birth to one of his children.

    Continue reading...

    Lawyers for Epstein’s victims say they were ‘almost completely ignored’ in interview

    Prince Andrew is facing a transatlantic backlash over his extraordinary defence of his friendship with Jeffrey Epstein after lawyers who represent 10 of the billionaire predator’s victims branded the royal unrepentant and implausible and demanded that he speak to the FBI.

    After the royal’s defiant Newsnight interview on Saturday triggered a disbelieving reaction from the public and the media, the prince was under growing pressure from critics in the UK and US on Sunday who demanded an apology for his conduct and said that his defence of his actions was simply not credible.

    Continue reading...

    Trump tactic suggesting Marie Yovanovitch and Alexander Vindman have mixed loyalties criticized as bigoted

    Republicans and Donald Trump have sought to smear key witnesses in the impeachment inquiry against the president as having dual or mixed loyalties to the US, due to being born abroad.

    The move has sparked condemnation as a bigoted tactic that has maligned career US diplomats and officials as being potentially disloyal to their adopted country due to not being born in America.

    Continue reading...

    Police say 10 people shot by unknown assailants at family gathering in California city

    Four people have been shot dead in Fresno, California, after suspects entered a backyard party and fired into the crowd, police said.

    The shooting took place at about 6pm at a residence in the south-east of the city where people were gathered to watch a football game, according to Fresno police.

    Continue reading...

    Even the prime minister has chopped the vegetable out of her official menu after monsoon caused Indian crop failure

    Bangladesh has been forced to import planeloads of onions as the price of the cooking staple soared to record highs, an official said, with even the prime minister chopping the bulb from her menu.

    The price of onions – a sensitive subject in south Asia where shortages can trigger widespread discontent with political ramifications – has climbed to eye-watering levels in Bangladesh since neighbouring India banned exports in late September after heavy monsoon rains reduced the crop.

    Continue reading...

    Dean Baquet decries abuse of journalists and defends not calling president racist

    The executive editor of the New York Times has accused Donald Trump of putting his reporters’ lives at risk by subjecting them to personal abuse and describing them as “enemies of the people”.

    Dean Baquet, who has led the news outlet during one of the most tumultuous periods in its history, said the US president’s history of verbal attacks on journalists such as the New York Times’s political reporter Maggie Haberman was “appalling” and risked having serious consequences.

    Continue reading...

    Confirmed case in autonomous region of Inner Mongolia comes after two cases in Beijing

    China’s Inner Mongolia has reported a fresh, confirmed case of bubonic plague despite an earlier declaration by the country’s health officials that the risk of an outbreak was minimal.

    The health commission of the autonomous region said a 55-year-old man was diagnosed with the disease after he ate wild rabbit meat on 5 November.

    Continue reading...

    BBC’s Panorama alleges state covered up killings of civilians in Afghanistan and Iraq

    The international criminal court may investigate the British military for the first time after allegations that war crimes had been committed, the BBC has reported.

    The broadcaster’s Panorama programme has claimed killings of civilians in Afghanistan and Iraq have been covered up by the state.

    Continue reading...

    Three decades after the Berlin Wall fell, the crossing is a mess of souvenir shops and fast-food restaurants – and time is running out to change things

    It was the most famous border crossing in the Berlin Wall, the official gateway for allied diplomats, military personnel and foreigners to enter communist East Berlin by road.

    And in 1961, Checkpoint Charlie seized the world’s attention when a diplomatic spat about allied forces’ freedom to travel in East Berlin quickly escalated and saw Soviet and American tanks squaring up to one another. The world watched aghast, fearful of a third world war, as a formidable flock of superpower tanks rolled towards the border, standing just 100 yards apart.

    Continue reading...

    Restaurants offering fixed-price three-course menús have been a cornerstone of the country’s urban life for decades, but tourism, shorter lunch breaks and gentrification have put them under threat. What will it take to fight back?

    Food is at the heart of Spanish culture. From social life to business deals, everything revolves around food – above all, lunch. How did Mariano Rajoy, then prime minister, react last year when faced with an unprecedented vote of no confidence? He went to lunch. For eight hours.

    The three-course menú del día has been the cornerstone of Spanish cuisine and social life for generations. Consequently, the restaurants serving these menús – generally low on aesthetics and high on value for money – have been a feature of the urban landscape. Now, though, their existence is threatened by a combination of rising rents, changing tastes and working hours, tourism and gentrification.

    Continue reading...

    A bureaucratic loophole has left Kafr Aqab as a district where Palestinians can keep a foot in both Jerusalem and the West Bank – and be with their loved ones

    For some Palestinian sweethearts, there’s only one place to live.

    It’s an unremarkable suburb, crisscrossed by thin muddy streets and dotted with high-rise apartment blocks that cling to the steep hills on the outskirts of Jerusalem.

    Continue reading...

    While hi-tech cosmopolitan centres like Milan flourish financially and culturally, former industrial towns continue to decline

    Night-time haunts go in and out of fashion, but the Bar Basso in Milan, which opened in 1967, remains one of the city’s most venerable social institutions. Embodying a very Milanese combination of stylish prosperity and tasteful design, it is a favourite destination for the area’s creative elite and the discreetly wealthy.

    Tucked away in a corner, Pierluigi Dialuce is explaining why, if a political nightmare unfolds in the rest of Italy, the city he has made his home will be able to cope.

    Continue reading...

    The director and actor talks about his near-death experience, becoming vegan and the star-studded reboot of the film that first made him famous 25 years ago

    In February last year, Kevin Smith performed 90 minutes of standup for a TV special, padded back to the green room and started to worry that the joint he had smoked before the show was too strong. He was sweaty and nauseous, which was not entirely out of the ordinary. But after he lay down on the tile floor and vomited, he was rushed to hospital, where a doctor broke the news that Smith was having a massive heart attack.

    Smith stayed calm. Honestly, he tells me, as we talk at his Hollywood Hills home, he was still stoned. On learning that he might die, he says: “I was like: ‘I’m going to make peace with this right away.’ You did way more than you ever set out to do, you got to do some cool shit, and if it’s done, it’s done.”

    Continue reading...

    Planned changes would be biggest shakeup to country’s electoral system for 50 years

    A bill is being introduced that would give the vote to 16- and 17-year-olds in many elections in Wales and empower local authorities to decide which voting system they use.

    The Labour-led Welsh government said the planned changes would be the biggest in the Welsh electoral system since the voting age was reduced to 18 in the UK half a century ago. They come as a bill to reduce the voting age to 16 for Welsh assembly elections nears the end of its journey through the Senedd.

    Continue reading...

    The country’s traditional powerhouses on the centre-left and the centre-right face a moment of reckoning

    Postwar German politics has a reputation for being moderate, consensual and a touch on the dull side. But there have been moments of high drama. In November 1959, for example, the Social Democratic party (SPD) abandoned its historic ambition to replace capitalism with socialism, dropped the Marxist account of class struggle and began to pitch itself as a broad-based Volkspartei (people’s party). History vindicated the decision. For the next 50 years or so, the SPD vied for power with the country’s other great political force, the CDU (and its CSU Bavarian ally), as both parties regularly achieved a vote share of over 40%.

    Famed for their practice of big-tent politics, what the CDU and SPD would give for such numbers now. The agonies of Brexit and the rise of rightwing populism have claimed the political limelight around Europe. But those looking for clues to the continent’s future would do well to watch Germany closely over the coming weeks.

    Continue reading...

    A radical experiment to genetically modify a strain of mosquito in order to stop them breeding malaria-carrying daughters is one of the latest efforts to tackle the deadly scourge of malaria

    At 6.30am five-year-old Osman Balama and his mother reach the state hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso, the second-largest city in Burkina Faso. He hasn’t been feeling well for a few days and his mother is worried that he has contracted malaria. The waiting room is already full of mothers and grandmothers with young children on their laps, all with the same tired look as Osman.

    “The rainy season has started,” says Sami Palm, head of the clinic. “That means more mosquitos. I’m certain that almost everyone here has malaria.”

    Continue reading...

    The Cuban government is planning a jubilee week as the capital city celebrates the anniversary of its birth, with hundreds of events at restored monuments and historic sites, a visit from the Spanish royal family and fireworks over the Malecon seaside promenade. Archive photographs show how much, and how little, the capital has changed

    The Revolution Museum, which was inaugurated in 1920 as the presidential palace, before becoming a museum in 1974

    Continue reading...

    Teargas stops protesters escaping despite president of Polytechnic University assuring them of safe passage

    Live updates: police fire teargas at protesters trying to leave campus

    Hong Kong police have trapped hundreds of people inside a university in the city, firing teargas at any protesters trying to escape the campus.

    Polytechnic University, a sprawling campus that has been occupied by protesters since last week, has become the site of the most prolonged and tense confrontation between police and demonstrators in more than five months of political unrest.

    Continue reading...

    Charity regulator takes action against Aussie Farms, who Scott Morrison called ‘grubs’ following on-farm protests

    Animal activist group Aussie Farms – the organisation that published farm details for vegan protesters and consumers – has had its charity status revoked.

    The charity regulator, Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission, announced on Monday that it had revoked the organisation’s charity status following an investigation sparked by federal government complaints.

    Continue reading...

    O’Plérou Grebet designs images that reflect culture of his country, Ivory Coast

    In January 2018, O’Plérou Grebet set himself a challenge. For every day of the year, the graphic design student, then aged 20, decided to design an emoji that reflected the culture of his home country, Ivory Coast, and the wider region of West Africa.

    “I wanted to create a project to promote African cultures to change the image the Western media have of Africa: hunger, poverty and wars,” he said. “I wanted to show a different and positive side.”

    Continue reading...

    Discrimination against girls is still entrenched in the laws of many African countries. Shocking examples are easy to find

    I love my job, but it can be pretty depressing. I’ve spent the past year researching and writing the first-ever continental report of the routine, blatant discrimination suffered by African girls.

    The fact that girls and women are treated as inferior citizens is hardly news, except that this report reveals the extent to which gender discrimination is frequently state-sanctioned – embedded into the laws, policies and practices of many African nations. We’re talking about legal, institutional discrimination with its roots in a deeply gendered and patriarchal society. We are also talking about the denial of respect for the dignity of the African girl.

    Continue reading...

    New research raises hopes of oral vaccine for dogs, the chief source of transmission to humans

    Researchers have discovered a way to stop rabies from shutting down critical responses in the immune system, a breakthrough that could pave the way for new tools to fight the deadly disease.

    Rabies kills almost 60,000 people each year, mostly affecting poor and rural communities.

    Continue reading...

    Study of chicken egg samples reveals presence of dangerous chemical compounds around areas where waste is dumped

    Plastic waste exports to south-east Asia have been implicated in extreme levels of toxins entering the human food chain in Indonesia.

    A new study that sampled chicken eggs around sites in the country where plastic waste accumulates identified alarming levels of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls long recognised as extremely injurious to human health.

    Continue reading...

    Toppling of Bolivian president reignites movement to remove leftist ally Nicolás Maduro

    Venezuela’s flagging opposition movement has hit the streets for its first major protests in months, as leaders sought to reignite their campaign to force Nicolás Maduro from power after his leftist ally Evo Morales was toppled in Bolivia.

    Thousands of protesters took to the streets on Saturday morning in towns and cities across the crisis-stricken south American country, hoping the dramatic sea change in Bolivian politics might portend similar change in Venezuela.

    Continue reading...

    How poignant that Behrouz was freed from Australia’s grip and welcomed by Christchurch, a city that knows prejudice only too well

    Today our world is a little freer, a little fairer, and a little more hopeful. Today, one less innocent man is incarcerated in Australia’s detention camp on Manus Island, guilty only of seeking refuge from persecution. Behrouz Boochani was no ordinary detainee. The Iranian Kurdish journalist and author became the voice of Manus detainees, and with it the persistent conscience of us all as we learned of the atrocities committed by the Australian government on its remote Pacific island detention camps.

    How poignant that he was finally freed to visit Christchurch, a city that knows only too well the violence and suffering borne of prejudice. A city that wrapped its arms so warmly around its refugee community after a terror attack just seven months ago, to heal their wounds and stand for inclusion. Behrouz has said that Christchurch has taught the world about kindness this year. He is also quick to note that the prejudice that leads to violence against refugees is the same that underpins policies allowing cruel treatment of them by governments such as Australia’s. For him, the plight of refugees and displaced persons across the globe right now is connected to the fear-mongering politics of Donald Trump and Scott Morrison.

    Continue reading...

    Beyond the tussle between Democrat Adam Schiff and Republican Devin Nunes is the big question – will party interest reign supreme?

    The battle for American hearts and minds in the unfolding impeachment drama is, at its core, a battle between two very different California congressmen.

    In the red corner is Devin Nunes, a Republican former dairy farmer from the state’s agricultural Central Valley, who long ago threw his lot in with Fox News talking-point orthodoxy and has never hesitated to defend Donald Trump, no matter how much the rest of the political establishment – and the factual record – was arrayed against him.

    Continue reading...

    The mosque attacks rocked New Zealand but good deeds and generosity will help keep us together

    The day of 15 March 2019 will stay with me forever. I was working in my bedroom, listening to radio and drawing. The on-air chat and music was interrupted as news of a shooting at a mosque in Christchurch began to filter through. How could this possibly be happening in our quiet little island tucked away at the bottom of the world?

    I brushed it off as some sort of mistake, until news of a shooting at a second mosque emerged minutes later. While witnesses and locals reported the horror that had just unfolded, I scrolled online looking for some sort of explanation, a way to make sense of it – and found everyone was lost for words as I was.

    Continue reading...

    Hundreds of Hong Kong protesters have been trapped inside the Polytechnic University campus they have been occupying since last week. Despite a pledge from the university president that demonstrators could leave peacefully, those who tried to leave were forced back into the campus by teargas and water cannon 

    Continue reading...

    Police deployed water cannon against protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday, in some cases using blue-dyed water laced with pepper spray. Teargas was also fired in an attempt to drive people away from the streets outside Polytechnic University. Protesters who occupied several university campuses last week have largely retreated, but hardliners have fortified themselves inside the campus and are refusing to leave

    Continue reading...

    Chinese soldiers stationed in Hong Kong came out to clear streets on Saturday, which protesters had strewn with debris to slow down any police advances while they had been on the campus. People's Liberation Army soldiers joined the cleanup outside Hong Kong Baptist University, the site of clashes earlier in the week. They can only be deployed to help with disaster relief or to maintain public order if requested by the local government. The controversial move threatens to escalate already high tensions in the Chinese territory

    Continue reading...

    Thirty years ago, Czech photographer Bohumil Eichler was working for a dissident student-run news agency when the Velvet Revolution began. His work from Prague has rarely been seen, until now.

    Continue reading...

    The second day of impeachment hearings featured compelling testimony from Marie Yovanovitch, the former US ambassador to Ukraine who was sacked by Trump. Yovanovitch evidence drew links between corrupt elements in Ukraine and the Trump administration's push to force her from her post. She said she was 'shocked and devastated' by Trump's personal attacks on her. As she spoke, Donald Trump attacked her on Twitter, prompting the Democrat chair of the hearing, Adam Schiff, to read the tweets to Yovanovitch in real time. 'The effect is intimidating,' she said, as Democrats accused the president of witness intimidation on a day of high political drama 

    Continue reading...

    The US president has denied that attacks directed at the former US ambassador to Ukraine, as she testified in the second day of impeachment hearings, amounted to witness intimidation.  'Everywhere Marie Yovanovitch went turned bad,' Trump wrote in tweets which were dramatically read aloud to Yovanovitch at the hearing. Democrats immediately accused Trump of attempting to intimidate a witness.

    Continue reading...

    Adam Schiff, the Democratic chairman of the House intelligence committee, read out a tweet by Donald Trump disparaging Marie Yovanovitch as the former US ambassador to Ukraine testified to the president's impeachment hearing. When Schiff asked whether she thought the tweet was intended to intimidate her, Yovanovitch replied: 'I can’t speak to what the president is trying to do, but I think the effect is to be intimidating.'

    Schiff replied: 'I want to let you know, ambassador, that some of us here take witness intimidation very, very seriously.'

    Continue reading...

  • odrnews.com ©