Seven Questions to Improve Your Business, Your Relationships, and Your Life


Seven Questions to Improve Your Business, Your Relationships, and Your Life

One of the most powerful tools we have as humans is our ability to ask questions. The more adept we are at asking them (and waiting for and listening to the answers), the more effective we will be. Here are seven great questions to use everyday.

1.Why? Asking "why?" is a powerful way to gain an understanding of the causes of problems we encounter. Ask the question again and again to uncover the root causes of your problems.


2.What did I learn? This most basic reflective question is key to progress in any phase of your life. Take the time to ask this question each day.


3.How can I help you? By focusing on attention on the needs of others you will be improving ourselves, as well as our relationships.


4.What if? This question helps you free your creativity to look for new solutions or just to see new possibilities for yourself.


5.How can this be improved? This question focuses you on improving your situation. It helps you focus on the current situation and how to take your results to a new level.


6.How can I show my gratitude? A spirit of thankfulness is key to long-term happiness. Thinking about how to show gratitude (and then doing it!) will also help strengthen your relationships.


7.What is the best use of my time now? Asking this classic question helps to refocus on what's most important to us, whenever we ask it.

1999, All Rights Reserved, Kevin Eikenberry. Kevinpublishes Unleash Your Potential, a free weekly ezine designed to provide ideas, tools, techniques and inspiration to enhance your professional skills. Go to www.kevineikenberry.com/uypw/current.asp">http://www.kevineikenberry.com/uypw/current.asp to read the current issue and subscribe. Kevin is also President of The Kevin Eikenberry Group, a learning consultanting company that helps Clients reach their potential through a variety of training, consulting and speaking services.You can contact Kevin at toll free 888.LEARNER.


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