The 10 Benefits of Cross Cultural Training


Cross cultural differences can and do impede upon communication and interpersonal relationships. In the business world this occurs daily, where people from different cultures interact and are expected to perform and make decisions. Cross cultural training aims to develop awareness between people where a common cultural framework does not exist in order to promote clear lines of communication and better relationships.

Cross cultural training has many benefits to be gained by both participants and businesses. For participants in cross cultural training, the 10 main benefits are that it helps:

People Learn About Themselves: Through cross cultural training, people are exposed to facts and information about their own cultures, preconceptions, mentalities and worldviews that they may otherwise not have contemplated. Cross cultural training helps people learn more about themselves through learning about others.

Encourage Confidence: Cross cultural training promotes self-confidence in individuals and teams through empowering them with a sense of control over previously difficult challenges in the workplace.

Break Down Barriers: All of us have certain barriers such as preconceptions, prejudices and stereotypes that obstruct our understanding of other people. Cross cultural training demystifies other cultures through presenting them under an objective light. Through learning about other cultures, barriers are slowly chipped away thus allowing for more open relationships and dialogue.

Build Trust: When people's barriers are lowered, mutual understanding ensues, which results in greater trust. Once trust is established altruistic tendencies naturally manifest allowing for greater co-operation and a more productive workplace.

Motivate: One of the outcomes of cross cultural training is that people begin to see their roles within the workplace more clearly. Through self-analysis people begin to recognise areas in which they need to improve and become motivated to develop and progress.

Open Horizons: Cross cultural training addresses problems in the workplace at a very different angle to traditional methods. Its innovative, alternative and motivating way of analysing and resolving problems helps people to adopt a similarly creative strategy when approaching challenges in their work or personal lives.

Develop Interpersonal Skills: Through cross cultural training participants develop great 'people skills' that can be applied in all walks of life. By learning about the influence of culture, i.e. the hidden factors upon people's behaviours, those who undertake cross cultural training begin to deal with people with a sensitivity and understanding that may have previously been lacking.

Develop Listening Skills: Listening is an integral element of effective and productive communication. Cross cultural training helps people to understand how to listen, what to listen for and how to interpret what they hear within a much broader framework of understanding. By becoming good listeners, people naturally become good communicators.

People Use Common Ground: In the workplace people have a tendency to focus on differences. When cross cultural communication problems arise the natural inclination is to withdraw to opposing sides and to highlight the negative aspects of the other. Cross cultural training assists in developing a sense of mutual understanding between people by highlighting common ground. Once spaces of mutual understanding are established, people begin to use them to overcome culturally challenging situations.

Career Development: Cross cultural training enhances people's skills and therefore future employment opportunities. Having cross cultural awareness gives people a competitive edge over others especially when applying for positions in international companies with a large multi-cultural staff base.

The above benefits are but a few of the many ways in which cross cultural training positively affects businesses through staff training and development.

Neil Payne is Managing Director of Kwintessential. Visit their site at: www.kwintessential.co.uk/cross-cultural/cross-cultural-awareness.html">http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/cross-cultural/cross-cultural-awareness.html


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• In the article titled Partition, 70 years on (Review, 5 August) your contributors failed to acknowledge a single Indian achievement. India is a relative place of calm. Tens of millions of people from different faiths and ethnic background go about their lives with no fear. Many have achieved the highest positions in Indian society. This is a country where persecuted Zoroastrians, Bahá’ís, Tibetans and many others have found a safe home; that embraced mother Theresa and gave her the highest honour; where Jewish people have lived for 2,000 years and never faced any persecution. India’s education system has produced people who now dominate Nasa and the Silicon Valley in US. Some Indian educational institutions are among the best in the world. India is a world leader in IT, it has a multibillion-dollar space commerce business, launching satellites for many countries. It is one of the few countries to have designed a super computer. There are 56 Indian companies featured in the Forbes 2000 list of the largest and most powerful companies in the world. Midnight’s children have achieved a lot.
Nitin Mehta
London

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Researchers are exploring how community, connection and trust could help protect society’s most vulnerable

In 2016, Louise Vincent lost both her teenage daughter and her right leg. The leg had been injured in a car accident; after doctors failed to treat her pain effectively, she ultimately relapsed into opioid addiction and an infection festered.

Her daughter, Selena – who, like her mother, had diagnoses of both addiction and bipolar disorder – died at 19 of an opioid overdose while in rehab. Her mother had sent her away to try to protect her. But the program turned out to be so negligent that it had no overdose protocol or antidote on hand.

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We break down how the White House, Breitbart News, Steve Bannon and Trump’s cabinet are all connected to recent events in Charlottesville

Activists say so. A group of civil rights and faith leaders called on Donald Trump to directly disavow the white supremacists marching in Charlottesville on Saturday and fire White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, deputy assistant Sebastian Gorka and senior adviser Stephen Miller, whom they say “have stoked hate and division”.

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The president’s refusal to properly condemn the attack in Charlottesville is consistent with past comments and a divisive campaign that stoked hatred

After the deadly violence involving white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Donald Trump’s failure to find the right response, Barack Obama stepped into the void with an assist from South Africa’s first black president, Nelson Mandela: “No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love. For love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

Trump’s tepid response, so stark in contrast to his predecessor’s handling of tragedies such as the Sandy Hook school and Charleston church shootings, is arguably the low point of his short presidency to date. It is likely to dominate journalists’ questions at his next public appearance – originally expected in Washington DC on Monday but now unlikely during his single day in the capital.

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No previous US president of modern times would have failed to condemn his country’s white nationalists. This one did

As George W Bush’s speechwriter put it this weekend, it is one of the “difficult but primary duties” of a political leader to speak for a nation in traumatic times. A space shuttle explodes, a school student goes on a shooting spree, a terrorist flies a plane into a building, a hurricane floods a city. When such things happen, Michael Gerson wrote in the Washington Post, “It falls to the president to express something of the nation’s soul.” Yet if Donald Trump’s words about the violent white extremist mobilisation in Virginia on Saturday – which an under-pressure White House was desperately trying to clarify on Sunday – are an expression of its soul, America may be on the road to perdition.

The original United States of America was built on white supremacy. The US constitution of 1787 treated black slaves as equivalent to three-fifths of a free white and gave no rights at all to Native Americans, who were regarded as belonging to their own nations. After the civil war, Jim Crow laws enforced segregation across the defeated south and comprehensively disfranchised African Americans for nearly a century. Writing Mein Kampf in the 1920s, Adolf Hitler praised America’s institutional racism as a model from which Nazi Germany could learn. Only in the postwar period, and then slowly and incompletely, was meaningful racial equality pursued by the land of the free.

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The white supremacists Donald Trump is loath to criticise made city’s plan to remove a Confederate statue their rallying point

Eight years ago, as the nation’s first black president took office, pundits debated whether Barack Obama’s election marked the rise of a “post-racial America”.

On Saturday, hundreds of American neo-Nazis and white nationalists clashed with anti-fascist demonstrators in the streets of a liberal university town, sending the city into chaos as the governor declared a state of emergency. The white nationalists had planned to rally around a statue of the Confederate general Robert E Lee, which Charlottesville, Virginia, had decided to remove from a public park.

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When she was 30, Suzy Hansen left the US for Istanbul – and began to realise that Americans will never understand their own country until they see it as the rest of the world does

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Police commissioner Josep Lluis Trapero says two people have been arrested who are suspected of direct links to the Barcelona van attack and an earlier explosion at a flat 200km away in Alcanar in which one person was killed and several injured. Neither of the detainees was the driver of the van in Thursday’s atrocity, he said. The arrests took place in the northern Catalan town of Ripoll and in Alcanar. The incidents in Barcelona and Alcanar are being linked to the killing by police of four terror suspects in Cambrils, 120km from Barcelona.

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People take cover as approximately eight shots ring out in the town of Cambrils, about 120km from Barcelona early on Friday. Catalan police later confirmed that officers shot dead four alleged ‘perpetrators’ and injured one more during the counter-terror raids there. It follows the deaths of at least 13 people in a van attack in Barcelona.

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The Spanish prime minister Mariano Rajoy says his country stands in solidarity with Barcelona, which he says has been hit by ‘jihadi terrorism’. Rajoy made his comments after a van veered onto a pavement in a busy pedestrian zone in Barcelona’s Las Ramblas district, killing 13 people and injuring many more.

• Barcelona attack – latest updates

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Images from the scene of deadly rampage that left at least 13 dead and many more injured in Barcelona

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A Canadian woman who lost her engagement ring 13 years ago while weeding her garden on the family farm is wearing it proudly again after her daughter-in-law pulled it from the ground attached to a misshapen carrot. Mary Grams, 84, says she never told her husband, Norman, that she lost the ring

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The Dugway proving ground is run by the US military in the middle of the Utah desert. Inside the 800,000-acre facility, staff test some of the deadliest biological and chemical agents on Earth, developing procedures to counter their effects and train military units in simulated hostile environments

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Hundreds of people gather at the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville on Wednesday evening for a candlelit vigil against hate and violence. Marchers assembled peacefully in the same place where hundreds of torch-carrying white nationalists marched on Friday, when several fights broke out. There were chaotic scenes at the weekend during another rally in which a counter-protester was killed.

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